Hayden's Ferry Review is the international literary journal out of Arizona State University.

General Notes on Submission (or withdrawal)

  • Please send one submission per genre at a time, and wait for a response before you submit additional work.
  • Simultaneous submissions are welcome. If your work is accepted elsewhere, please notify the editors immediately by adding a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • Withdraw your submission using Submittable. if you are only withdrawing a section of your work (for example: 1/3 poems), add a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • Please limit your poetry submissions to a maximum of 3 poems totaling up to 8 pages. 
  • Please limit your prose submissions to under 20 pages.
  • All prose should be double-spaced.
  • We are always open to submissions of visual art and translations.
  • Contributors receive one copy of the issue in which they appear. Additional copies may be purchased for $6 each up to 5 copies. 
  • We do not accept previously published material. 
  • We do not consider book-length works. 
  • Submitters are strongly encouraged to read the journal before submitting: to subscribe, visit http://haydensferryreview.com/store.
  • Anyone affiliated with ASU (staff, faculty, and graduate/undergraduate students) should refrain from submitting to HFR until they have been unaffiliated for three years.
  • If you have previously been published in HFR's print journal or a web issue, please wait 2 years from your publication date before submitting again.
  • By submitting, you are agreeing to receive occasional newsletter emails from us. You are welcome to opt out at any time and a link to do so will be included in each newsletter.

PLEASE NOTE: We no longer accept submissions by mail. We will only review work that has been received through Submittable.

A Note on the Submission Fee

We know the $3.00 submission fee might be a pain, but we hope that you will rest assured knowing the money we receive goes toward supporting HFR's continued success as a supportive environment for our contributors. We all want to thank you for your trust in sending us your work. 

We are waiving our submission fee for Black and Indigenous writers.

Art submissions are always free, but during months when we are open for any other genre submissions, we will have additional Submittable forms where Black and Indigenous writers and artists can submit for free.

A note on accessibility: It has come to our attention that Submittable may not be accessible to visually impaired writers. HFR is committed to accessibility and wants to receive submissions from all writers equally. If you are a visually impaired writer who is currently unable to submit via Submittable due to accessibility issues, you may email your submission as an attachment in .pdf format to haydensferryreview AT gmail.com. Note that submissions received via email which are outside the current submission period, or do not suit the current call(s) or current guidelines, will not receive a response. If you have questions concerning this policy, please email us at the above address.

Ends on This opportunity will close after 400 submissions have been received.$3.00
$3.00

Issue 72: Re-mix

When we re-mix something, we re-imagine what it is, what it was, or what it has the capacity to be. We live in a constant state of re-mix, taking the substance of the world as we experience it, then creasing and folding it at the corners to create something new, but familiar. Novel, but known. In this way, we allow our art to re-write narratives, re-play memories, re-stitch language, and re-state truths.

In Issue 72: Re-mix, we call for work that embraces re-imagination in all its possibilities. Send us work that forces us to re-consider myth, memory, and history as they’re known; to re-think the bounds of form and structure and convention. Send us work that relishes in collaboration, in collage; that asks us to re-think the relationship between the art and the artist, the word and the page, the language and its potential.

The stories, poems, essays, art, translations, and hybrid work we seek to include in Issue 72 do not have to be strict re-tellings or re-imaginations of preexisting narratives. We embrace work that interprets “re-mix” at any level of the creative process, in any form–including re-mixes with the self, and with one’s previous iterations of their memories or art.

Some examples we love include Carmen Maria Machado's short story “The Husband Stitch,” which re-imagines urban legend; Terrance Hayes’s poem “The Golden Shovel,’ written in a form invented by Hayes and which gives homage to Gwendolyn Brooks; Kim Seong Eun and Cindy Juyoung Ok’s collaborative poem “P.S. Please Forgive Poor Grammar” in which emails are re-arranged; and Fat Free Art and Sotheby’s Old Master department’s Street Masters, which features street artists’ re-interpretations of classic paintings.

Send us your hybrid work, your cross-genre masterpieces, your collaborative experiments. Send us your poems that tear the world as you see it into pieces, then patch it back together. Send us your essays that re-write archives, your stories that re-imagine worlds.

A Note on Translations:

We see the very act of literary translation as a “re-mix:” taking a work originally crafted in one language and re-imagining it in another. In this sense, all translations meet the “re-mix” theme.

Because translators are limited in “re-mixing” the content or form of the original piece, we wanted to outline some additional ways a translator might approach the theme:

  • Translating work that already re-mixes or re-imagines in some way
  • Self-translation
  • Experimental translation
  • Translation across genres
  • Cross-lingual interaction (like writing a response to poem in another language)

A Note on Hybrid Work:

If you’re unsure what genre to submit your hybrid work in, please select the genre that feels most fitting.

A Note on Content Warnings:

If you are submitting work that you feel would be appropriately accompanied by a content warning, please feel free to include such content warning at the bottom of your cover letter, and/or at the very top of your submission file.

Submission Guidelines

  • Submit up to 3 poems totaling up to 8 pages. Please include your entire submission in one file, and be sure your name and contact information are included on the first page of the file.
  • All work should be uploaded through our submission manager. Acceptable file formats include .doc, .docx, and .pdf.
  • Please send one submission per genre at a time, and wait for a response before you submit additional work.
  • Simultaneous submissions are welcome. If your work is accepted elsewhere, please notify the editors immediately by adding a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • Withdraw your submission using Submittable. If you are only withdrawing a section of your work (for example: 1/3 poems), add a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • We do not accept previously published material.
  • We do not consider book-length works. Submitters are strongly encouraged to read the journal before submitting. Sample work from current and past issues is available on our website.

We are waiving our submission fee for Black and Indigenous writers. Please submit via the Black and Indigenous Authors submission link: https://hfr.submittable.com/submit. If you have any questions please email us (haydensferryreview at gmail dot com)

Ends on This opportunity will close after 400 submissions have been received.$3.00
$3.00

Issue 72: Re-mix

When we re-mix something, we re-imagine what it is, what it was, or what it has the capacity to be. We live in a constant state of re-mix, taking the substance of the world as we experience it, then creasing and folding it at the corners to create something new, but familiar. Novel, but known. In this way, we allow our art to re-write narratives, re-play memories, re-stitch language, and re-state truths.

In Issue 72: Re-mix, we call for work that embraces re-imagination in all its possibilities. Send us work that forces us to re-consider myth, memory, and history as they’re known; to re-think the bounds of form and structure and convention. Send us work that relishes in collaboration, in collage; that asks us to re-think the relationship between the art and the artist, the word and the page, the language and its potential.

The stories, poems, essays, art, translations, and hybrid work we seek to include in Issue 72 do not have to be strict re-tellings or re-imaginations of preexisting narratives. We embrace work that interprets “re-mix” at any level of the creative process, in any form–including re-mixes with the self, and with one’s previous iterations of their memories or art.

Some examples we love include Carmen Maria Machado's short story “The Husband Stitch,” which re-imagines urban legend; Terrance Hayes’s poem “The Golden Shovel,’ written in a form invented by Hayes and which gives homage to Gwendolyn Brooks; Kim Seong Eun and Cindy Juyoung Ok’s collaborative poem “P.S. Please Forgive Poor Grammar” in which emails are re-arranged; and Fat Free Art and Sotheby’s Old Master department’s Street Masters, which features street artists’ re-interpretations of classic paintings.

Send us your hybrid work, your cross-genre masterpieces, your collaborative experiments. Send us your poems that tear the world as you see it into pieces, then patch it back together. Send us your essays that re-write archives, your stories that re-imagine worlds.

A Note on Translations:

We see the very act of literary translation as a “re-mix:” taking a work originally crafted in one language and re-imagining it in another. In this sense, all translations meet the “re-mix” theme.

Because translators are limited in “re-mixing” the content or form of the original piece, we wanted to outline some additional ways a translator might approach the theme:

  • Translating work that already re-mixes or re-imagines in some way
  • Self-translation
  • Experimental translation
  • Translation across genres
  • Cross-lingual interaction (like writing a response to poem in another language)

A Note on Hybrid Work:

If you’re unsure what genre to submit your hybrid work in, please select the genre that feels most fitting.

A Note on Content Warnings:

If you are submitting work that you feel would be appropriately accompanied by a content warning, please feel free to include such content warning at the bottom of your cover letter, and/or at the very top of your submission file.

Submission Guidelines

  • We accept one story or novel excerpt per author at any given time.
  • Prose should be double-spaced. We do not have a strict word count, though we favor pieces under 17 pages, and rarely accept work that is over 20.
  • Please include your entire submission in one file, and be sure your name and contact information are included on the first page of the file.
  • All work should be uploaded through our submission manager. Acceptable file formats include .doc, .docx, and .pdf.
  • Please send one submission per genre at a time and wait for a response before you submit additional work.
  • Simultaneous submissions are welcome. If your work is accepted elsewhere, please notify the editors immediately by adding a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • Withdraw your submission using Submittable. If you are only withdrawing a section of your work, add a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • We do not accept previously published material.
  • We do not consider book-length works. Submitters are strongly encouraged to read the journal before submitting. Sample work from current and past issues is available on our website.

We are waiving our submission fee for Black and Indigenous writers. Please submit via the Black and Indigenous Authors submission link: https://hfr.submittable.com/submit. If you have any questions please email us (haydensferryreview at gmail dot com)

PLEASE NOTE: For Issue 72, general fiction submissions are capped at 400 submissions. 

Ends on This opportunity will close after 400 submissions have been received.$3.00
$3.00

Issue 72: Re-mix

When we re-mix something, we re-imagine what it is, what it was, or what it has the capacity to be. We live in a constant state of re-mix, taking the substance of the world as we experience it, then creasing and folding it at the corners to create something new, but familiar. Novel, but known. In this way, we allow our art to re-write narratives, re-play memories, re-stitch language, and re-state truths.

In Issue 72: Re-mix, we call for work that embraces re-imagination in all its possibilities. Send us work that forces us to re-consider myth, memory, and history as they’re known; to re-think the bounds of form and structure and convention. Send us work that relishes in collaboration, in collage; that asks us to re-think the relationship between the art and the artist, the word and the page, the language and its potential.

The stories, poems, essays, art, translations, and hybrid work we seek to include in Issue 72 do not have to be strict re-tellings or re-imaginations of preexisting narratives. We embrace work that interprets “re-mix” at any level of the creative process, in any form–including re-mixes with the self, and with one’s previous iterations of their memories or art.

Some examples we love include Carmen Maria Machado's short story “The Husband Stitch,” which re-imagines urban legend; Terrance Hayes’s poem “The Golden Shovel,’ written in a form invented by Hayes and which gives homage to Gwendolyn Brooks; Kim Seong Eun and Cindy Juyoung Ok’s collaborative poem “P.S. Please Forgive Poor Grammar” in which emails are re-arranged; and Fat Free Art and Sotheby’s Old Master department’s Street Masters, which features street artists’ re-interpretations of classic paintings.

Send us your hybrid work, your cross-genre masterpieces, your collaborative experiments. Send us your poems that tear the world as you see it into pieces, then patch it back together. Send us your essays that re-write archives, your stories that re-imagine worlds.

A Note on Translations:

We see the very act of literary translation as a “re-mix:” taking a work originally crafted in one language and re-imagining it in another. In this sense, all translations meet the “re-mix” theme.

Because translators are limited in “re-mixing” the content or form of the original piece, we wanted to outline some additional ways a translator might approach the theme:

  • Translating work that already re-mixes or re-imagines in some way
  • Self-translation
  • Experimental translation
  • Translation across genres
  • Cross-lingual interaction (like writing a response to poem in another language)

A Note on Hybrid Work:

If you’re unsure what genre to submit your hybrid work in, please select the genre that feels most fitting.

A Note on Content Warnings:

If you are submitting work that you feel would be appropriately accompanied by a content warning, please feel free to include such content warning at the bottom of your cover letter, and/or at the very top of your submission file.

Submission Guidelines

  • We accept one essay or memoir excerpt per author at any given time.
  • Prose should be double-spaced. We do not have a strict word count, though we favor pieces under 17 pages, and rarely accept work that is over 20.
  • Please include your entire submission in one file, and be sure your name and contact information are included on the first page of the file.
  • All work should be uploaded through our submission manager. Acceptable file formats include .doc, .docx, and .pdf.
  • Please send one submission per genre at a time and wait for a response before you submit additional work.
  • Simultaneous submissions are welcome. If your work is accepted elsewhere, please notify the editors immediately by adding a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • Withdraw your submission using Submittable. If you are only withdrawing a section of your work, add a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • We do not accept previously published material.
  • We do not consider book-length works. Submitters are strongly encouraged to read the journal before submitting. Sample work from current and past issues is available on our website.

We are waiving our submission fee for Black and Indigenous writers. Please submit via the Black and Indigenous Authors submission link: https://hfr.submittable.com/submit. If you have any questions please email us (haydensferryreview at gmail dot com)

Issue 72: Re-mix

When we re-mix something, we re-imagine what it is, what it was, or what it has the capacity to be. We live in a constant state of re-mix, taking the substance of the world as we experience it, then creasing and folding it at the corners to create something new, but familiar. Novel, but known. In this way, we allow our art to re-write narratives, re-play memories, re-stitch language, and re-state truths.

In Issue 72: Re-mix, we call for work that embraces re-imagination in all its possibilities. Send us work that forces us to re-consider myth, memory, and history as they’re known; to re-think the bounds of form and structure and convention. Send us work that relishes in collaboration, in collage; that asks us to re-think the relationship between the art and the artist, the word and the page, the language and its potential.

The stories, poems, essays, art, translations, and hybrid work we seek to include in Issue 72 do not have to be strict re-tellings or re-imaginations of preexisting narratives. We embrace work that interprets “re-mix” at any level of the creative process, in any form–including re-mixes with the self, and with one’s previous iterations of their memories or art.

Some examples we love include Carmen Maria Machado's short story “The Husband Stitch,” which re-imagines urban legend; Terrance Hayes’s poem “The Golden Shovel,’ written in a form invented by Hayes and which gives homage to Gwendolyn Brooks; Kim Seong Eun and Cindy Juyoung Ok’s collaborative poem “P.S. Please Forgive Poor Grammar” in which emails are re-arranged; and Fat Free Art and Sotheby’s Old Master department’s Street Masters, which features street artists’ re-interpretations of classic paintings.

Send us your hybrid work, your cross-genre masterpieces, your collaborative experiments. Send us your poems that tear the world as you see it into pieces, then patch it back together. Send us your essays that re-write archives, your stories that re-imagine worlds.

A Note on Translations:

We see the very act of literary translation as a “re-mix:” taking a work originally crafted in one language and re-imagining it in another. In this sense, all translations meet the “re-mix” theme.

Because translators are limited in “re-mixing” the content or form of the original piece, we wanted to outline some additional ways a translator might approach the theme:

  • Translating work that already re-mixes or re-imagines in some way
  • Self-translation
  • Experimental translation
  • Translation across genres
  • Cross-lingual interaction (like writing a response to poem in another language)

A Note on Hybrid Work:          

If you’re unsure what genre to submit your hybrid work in, please select the genre that feels most fitting.

A Note on Content Warnings:         

If you are submitting work that you feel would be appropriately accompanied by a content warning, please feel free to include such content warning at the bottom of your cover letter, and/or at the very top of your submission file.


Submission Guidelines

Translations submissions should be works translated into English from any other non-English language, and must include the original text along with the translated text.

  • Translators should secure rights to translate the work they are submitting.
  • Submit up to 6 poems/micro-fictions, or one essay/story.
  • Prose should be double-spaced. We do not have a strict word count, though we favor pieces under 17 pages, and rarely accept work that is over 20. Please do not submit pieces that are over 25 pages.
  • Please include your entire submission in one file, and be sure your name and contact information are included on the first page of the file.
  • All work should be uploaded through our submissions manager. Acceptable file formats include .doc, .docx, and .pdf.
  • Please send one submission per genre at a time, and wait for a response before you submit additional work.
  • Simultaneous submissions are welcome. If your work is accepted elsewhere, please notify the editors immediately by adding a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • Withdraw your submission using Submittable. If you are only withdrawing a section of your work (for example: 2/5 poems), add a message to your submission.
  • We do not accept previously published material.
  • We do not consider book-length works. Submitters are strongly encouraged to read the journal before submitting. Sample work from current and past issues is available on our website.
  • Upon acceptance, we will request a translator's note on your translation process (similar to an artist statement).

We are waiving our reading fee for Black and Indigenous writers. Please submit via the Black and Indigenous Authors submission link: https://hfr.submittable.com/submit. If you have any questions please email us (haydensferryreview at gmail dot com)

Issue 72: Re-mix

When we re-mix something, we re-imagine what it is, what it was, or what it has the capacity to be. We live in a constant state of re-mix, taking the substance of the world as we experience it, then creasing and folding it at the corners to create something new, but familiar. Novel, but known. In this way, we allow our art to re-write narratives, re-play memories, re-stitch language, and re-state truths.

In Issue 72: Re-mix, we call for work that embraces re-imagination in all its possibilities. Send us work that forces us to re-consider myth, memory, and history as they’re known; to re-think the bounds of form and structure and convention. Send us work that relishes in collaboration, in collage; that asks us to re-think the relationship between the art and the artist, the word and the page, the language and its potential.

The stories, poems, essays, art, translations, and hybrid work we seek to include in Issue 72 do not have to be strict re-tellings or re-imaginations of preexisting narratives. We embrace work that interprets “re-mix” at any level of the creative process, in any form–including re-mixes with the self, and with one’s previous iterations of their memories or art.

Some examples we love include Carmen Maria Machado's short story “The Husband Stitch,” which re-imagines urban legend; Terrance Hayes’s poem “The Golden Shovel,’ written in a form invented by Hayes and which gives homage to Gwendolyn Brooks; Kim Seong Eun and Cindy Juyoung Ok’s collaborative poem “P.S. Please Forgive Poor Grammar” in which emails are re-arranged; and Fat Free Art and Sotheby’s Old Master department’s Street Masters, which features street artists’ re-interpretations of classic paintings.

Send us your hybrid work, your cross-genre masterpieces, your collaborative experiments. Send us your poems that tear the world as you see it into pieces, then patch it back together. Send us your essays that re-write archives, your stories that re-imagine worlds.

A Note on Translations:

We see the very act of literary translation as a “re-mix:” taking a work originally crafted in one language and re-imagining it in another. In this sense, all translations meet the “re-mix” theme.

Because translators are limited in “re-mixing” the content or form of the original piece, we wanted to outline some additional ways a translator might approach the theme:

  • Translating work that already re-mixes or re-imagines in some way
  • Self-translation
  • Experimental translation
  • Translation across genres
  • Cross-lingual interaction (like writing a response to poem in another language)

A Note on Hybrid Work:

If you’re unsure what genre to submit your hybrid work in, please select the genre that feels most fitting.

A Note on Content Warnings:

If you are submitting work that you feel would be appropriately accompanied by a content warning, please feel free to include such content warning at the bottom of your cover letter, and/or at the very top of your submission file.

Submission Guidelines

We are looking for visual art in all categories. 

Please submit 5-8 pieces at a time. We may ask for additional art based on this submission. We accept work that has been previously published on the artist's social media or personal website but we do not accept work that has been previously published in other journals.

Upon acceptance, we will request high res files, an author's bio, and an artist's statement. We publish art in full color, often selecting between 2 and 4 artists for each issue. One of these will receive cover credit and bookmark credit. 

Issue 72: Re-mix

When we re-mix something, we re-imagine what it is, what it was, or what it has the capacity to be. We live in a constant state of re-mix, taking the substance of the world as we experience it, then creasing and folding it at the corners to create something new, but familiar. Novel, but known. In this way, we allow our art to re-write narratives, re-play memories, re-stitch language, and re-state truths.

In Issue 72: Re-mix, we call for work that embraces re-imagination in all its possibilities. Send us work that forces us to re-consider myth, memory, and history as they’re known; to re-think the bounds of form and structure and convention. Send us work that relishes in collaboration, in collage; that asks us to re-think the relationship between the art and the artist, the word and the page, the language and its potential.

The stories, poems, essays, art, translations, and hybrid work we seek to include in Issue 72 do not have to be strict re-tellings or re-imaginations of preexisting narratives. We embrace work that interprets “re-mix” at any level of the creative process, in any form–including re-mixes with the self, and with one’s previous iterations of their memories or art.

Some examples we love include Carmen Maria Machado's short story “The Husband Stitch,” which re-imagines urban legend; Terrance Hayes’s poem “The Golden Shovel,’ written in a form invented by Hayes and which gives homage to Gwendolyn Brooks; Kim Seong Eun and Cindy Juyoung Ok’s collaborative poem “P.S. Please Forgive Poor Grammar” in which emails are re-arranged; and Fat Free Art and Sotheby’s Old Master department’s Street Masters, which features street artists’ re-interpretations of classic paintings.

Send us your hybrid work, your cross-genre masterpieces, your collaborative experiments. Send us your poems that tear the world as you see it into pieces, then patch it back together. Send us your essays that re-write archives, your stories that re-imagine worlds.

A Note on Translations:

We see the very act of literary translation as a “re-mix:” taking a work originally crafted in one language and re-imagining it in another. In this sense, all translations meet the “re-mix” theme.

Because translators are limited in “re-mixing” the content or form of the original piece, we wanted to outline some additional ways a translator might approach the theme:

  • Translating work that already re-mixes or re-imagines in some way
  • Self-translation
  • Experimental translation
  • Translation across genres
  • Cross-lingual interaction (like writing a response to poem in another language)

A Note on Hybrid Work:

If you’re unsure what genre to submit your hybrid work in, please select the genre that feels most fitting.

A Note on Content Warnings:

If you are submitting work that you feel would be appropriately accompanied by a content warning, please feel free to include such content warning at the bottom of your cover letter, and/or at the very top of your submission file.

Submission Guidelines

We are waiving our submission fee for Black and Indigenous writers. Please submit your poetry pieces here and they will be reviewed by the appropriate editor. If you have questions concerning this policy, please email us.

  • Submit up to 3 poems totaling up to 8 pages.
  • Please include your entire submission in one file, and be sure your name and contact information are included on the first page of the file.
  • All work should be uploaded through our submissions manager. Acceptable file formats include .doc, .docx, and .pdf.
  • Please send one submission per genre at a time and wait for a response before you submit additional work.
  • Simultaneous submissions are welcome. If your work is accepted elsewhere, please notify the editors immediately by adding a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • Withdraw  your submission using Submittable. if you are only withdrawing a section of your work, add a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • We do not accept previously published material.
  • We do not consider book-length works. Submitters are strongly encouraged to read the journal before submitting. Sample work from current and past issues is available on our website.


Issue 72: Re-mix

When we re-mix something, we re-imagine what it is, what it was, or what it has the capacity to be. We live in a constant state of re-mix, taking the substance of the world as we experience it, then creasing and folding it at the corners to create something new, but familiar. Novel, but known. In this way, we allow our art to re-write narratives, re-play memories, re-stitch language, and re-state truths.

In Issue 72: Re-mix, we call for work that embraces re-imagination in all its possibilities. Send us work that forces us to re-consider myth, memory, and history as they’re known; to re-think the bounds of form and structure and convention. Send us work that relishes in collaboration, in collage; that asks us to re-think the relationship between the art and the artist, the word and the page, the language and its potential.

The stories, poems, essays, art, translations, and hybrid work we seek to include in Issue 72 do not have to be strict re-tellings or re-imaginations of preexisting narratives. We embrace work that interprets “re-mix” at any level of the creative process, in any form–including re-mixes with the self, and with one’s previous iterations of their memories or art.

Some examples we love include Carmen Maria Machado's short story “The Husband Stitch,” which re-imagines urban legend; Terrance Hayes’s poem “The Golden Shovel,’ written in a form invented by Hayes and which gives homage to Gwendolyn Brooks; Kim Seong Eun and Cindy Juyoung Ok’s collaborative poem “P.S. Please Forgive Poor Grammar” in which emails are re-arranged; and Fat Free Art and Sotheby’s Old Master department’s Street Masters, which features street artists’ re-interpretations of classic paintings.

Send us your hybrid work, your cross-genre masterpieces, your collaborative experiments. Send us your poems that tear the world as you see it into pieces, then patch it back together. Send us your essays that re-write archives, your stories that re-imagine worlds.

A Note on Translations:

We see the very act of literary translation as a “re-mix:” taking a work originally crafted in one language and re-imagining it in another. In this sense, all translations meet the “re-mix” theme.

Because translators are limited in “re-mixing” the content or form of the original piece, we wanted to outline some additional ways a translator might approach the theme:

  • Translating work that already re-mixes or re-imagines in some way
  • Self-translation
  • Experimental translation
  • Translation across genres
  • Cross-lingual interaction (like writing a response to poem in another language)

A Note on Hybrid Work:

If you’re unsure what genre to submit your hybrid work in, please select the genre that feels most fitting.

A Note on Content Warnings:

If you are submitting work that you feel would be appropriately accompanied by a content warning, please feel free to include such content warning at the bottom of your cover letter, and/or at the very top of your submission file.

Submission Guidelines

We are waiving our submission fee for Black and Indigenous writers. Please submit your fiction pieces here and they will be reviewed by the appropriate editor. If you have questions concerning this policy, please email us.

  • We accept one story or novel excerpt per author at any given time for Fiction.
  • Prose should be double-spaced. We do not have a strict word count, though we favor pieces under 17 pages, and rarely accept work that is over 20. Please do not submit pieces that are over 25 pages.
  • Please include your entire submission in one file, and be sure your name and contact information are included on the first page of the file.
  • All work should be uploaded through our submissions manager. Acceptable file formats include .doc, .docx, and .pdf.
  • Please send one submission per genre at a time and wait for a response before you submit additional work.
  • Simultaneous submissions are welcome. If your work is accepted elsewhere, please notify the editors immediately by adding a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • Withdraw  your submission using Submittable. if you are only withdrawing a section of your work, add a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • We do not accept previously published material.
  • We do not consider book-length works. Submitters are strongly encouraged to read the journal before submitting. Sample work from current and past issues is available on our website.


Issue 72: Re-mix

When we re-mix something, we re-imagine what it is, what it was, or what it has the capacity to be. We live in a constant state of re-mix, taking the substance of the world as we experience it, then creasing and folding it at the corners to create something new, but familiar. Novel, but known. In this way, we allow our art to re-write narratives, re-play memories, re-stitch language, and re-state truths.

In Issue 72: Re-mix, we call for work that embraces re-imagination in all its possibilities. Send us work that forces us to re-consider myth, memory, and history as they’re known; to re-think the bounds of form and structure and convention. Send us work that relishes in collaboration, in collage; that asks us to re-think the relationship between the art and the artist, the word and the page, the language and its potential.

The stories, poems, essays, art, translations, and hybrid work we seek to include in Issue 72 do not have to be strict re-tellings or re-imaginations of preexisting narratives. We embrace work that interprets “re-mix” at any level of the creative process, in any form–including re-mixes with the self, and with one’s previous iterations of their memories or art.

Some examples we love include Carmen Maria Machado's short story “The Husband Stitch,” which re-imagines urban legend; Terrance Hayes’s poem “The Golden Shovel,’ written in a form invented by Hayes and which gives homage to Gwendolyn Brooks; Kim Seong Eun and Cindy Juyoung Ok’s collaborative poem “P.S. Please Forgive Poor Grammar” in which emails are re-arranged; and Fat Free Art and Sotheby’s Old Master department’s Street Masters, which features street artists’ re-interpretations of classic paintings.

Send us your hybrid work, your cross-genre masterpieces, your collaborative experiments. Send us your poems that tear the world as you see it into pieces, then patch it back together. Send us your essays that re-write archives, your stories that re-imagine worlds.

A Note on Translations:

We see the very act of literary translation as a “re-mix:” taking a work originally crafted in one language and re-imagining it in another. In this sense, all translations meet the “re-mix” theme.

Because translators are limited in “re-mixing” the content or form of the original piece, we wanted to outline some additional ways a translator might approach the theme:

  • Translating work that already re-mixes or re-imagines in some way
  • Self-translation
  • Experimental translation
  • Translation across genres
  • Cross-lingual interaction (like writing a response to poem in another language)

A Note on Hybrid Work:

If you’re unsure what genre to submit your hybrid work in, please select the genre that feels most fitting.

A Note on Content Warnings:

If you are submitting work that you feel would be appropriately accompanied by a content warning, please feel free to include such content warning at the bottom of your cover letter, and/or at the very top of your submission file.

Submission Guidelines

We are waiving our submission fee for Black and Indigenous writers. Please submit your nonfiction pieces here and they will be reviewed by the appropriate editor. If you have questions concerning this policy, please email us.

  • We accept one essay or memoir excerpt per author at any given time for nonfiction.
  • Prose should be double-spaced. We do not have a strict word count, though we favor pieces under 17 pages, and rarely accept work that is over 20. Please do not submit pieces that are over 25 pages.
  • Please include your entire submission in one file, and be sure your name and contact information are included on the first page of the file.
  • All work should be uploaded through our submissions manager. Acceptable file formats include .doc, .docx, and .pdf.
  • Please send one submission per genre at a time and wait for a response before you submit additional work.
  • Simultaneous submissions are welcome. If your work is accepted elsewhere, please notify the editors immediately by adding a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • Withdraw your submission using Submittable. if you are only withdrawing a section of your work, add a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • We do not accept previously published material.
  • We do not consider book-length works. Submitters are strongly encouraged to read the journal before submitting. Sample work from current and past issues is available on our website.


Issue 72: Re-mix

When we re-mix something, we re-imagine what it is, what it was, or what it has the capacity to be. We live in a constant state of re-mix, taking the substance of the world as we experience it, then creasing and folding it at the corners to create something new, but familiar. Novel, but known. In this way, we allow our art to re-write narratives, re-play memories, re-stitch language, and re-state truths.

In Issue 72: Re-mix, we call for work that embraces re-imagination in all its possibilities. Send us work that forces us to re-consider myth, memory, and history as they’re known; to re-think the bounds of form and structure and convention. Send us work that relishes in collaboration, in collage; that asks us to re-think the relationship between the art and the artist, the word and the page, the language and its potential.

The stories, poems, essays, art, translations, and hybrid work we seek to include in Issue 72 do not have to be strict re-tellings or re-imaginations of preexisting narratives. We embrace work that interprets “re-mix” at any level of the creative process, in any form–including re-mixes with the self, and with one’s previous iterations of their memories or art.

Some examples we love include Carmen Maria Machado's short story “The Husband Stitch,” which re-imagines urban legend; Terrance Hayes’s poem “The Golden Shovel,’ written in a form invented by Hayes and which gives homage to Gwendolyn Brooks; Kim Seong Eun and Cindy Juyoung Ok’s collaborative poem “P.S. Please Forgive Poor Grammar” in which emails are re-arranged; and Fat Free Art and Sotheby’s Old Master department’s Street Masters, which features street artists’ re-interpretations of classic paintings.

Send us your hybrid work, your cross-genre masterpieces, your collaborative experiments. Send us your poems that tear the world as you see it into pieces, then patch it back together. Send us your essays that re-write archives, your stories that re-imagine worlds.

A Note on Translations:

We see the very act of literary translation as a “re-mix:” taking a work originally crafted in one language and re-imagining it in another. In this sense, all translations meet the “re-mix” theme.

Because translators are limited in “re-mixing” the content or form of the original piece, we wanted to outline some additional ways a translator might approach the theme:

  • Translating work that already re-mixes or re-imagines in some way
  • Self-translation
  • Experimental translation
  • Translation across genres
  • Cross-lingual interaction (like writing a response to poem in another language)

A Note on Hybrid Work:

If you’re unsure what genre to submit your hybrid work in, please select the genre that feels most fitting.

A Note on Content Warnings:

If you are submitting work that you feel would be appropriately accompanied by a content warning, please feel free to include such content warning at the bottom of your cover letter, and/or at the very top of your submission file.

Submission Guidelines

We are waiving our submission fee for Black and Indigenous writers. Please submit your translation pieces here. If you have questions concerning this policy, please email us.

  • Translations submissions should be works translated into English from any other non-English language, and must include the original text along with the translated text.
  • Translators should secure rights to translate the work they are submitting.
  • Submit up to 6 poems/micro-fictions, or one essay/story.
  • Prose should be double-spaced. We do not have a strict word count, though we favor pieces under 17 pages, and rarely accept work that is over 20. Please do not submit pieces that are over 25 pages.
  • Please include your entire submission in one file, and be sure your name and contact information are included on the first page of the file.
  • All work should be uploaded through our submissions manager. Acceptable file formats include .doc, .docx, and .pdf.
  • Please send one submission per genre at a time, and wait for a response before you submit additional work.
  • Simultaneous submissions are welcome. If your work is accepted elsewhere, please notify the editors immediately by adding a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • Withdraw your submission using Submittable. If you are only withdrawing a section of your work (for example: 2/5 poems), add a message to your submission in Submittable.
  • We do not accept previously published material.
  • We do not consider book-length works. Submitters are strongly encouraged to read the journal before submitting. Sample work from current and past issues is available on our website.
  • Upon acceptance, we will request a translator's note on your translation process (similar to an artist statement).
Hayden's Ferry Review